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Be review

Posted : 4 years ago on 5 June 2013 01:37 (A review of Be)

With the advantage of being able to observe everything calmly, it is easier to assess the path of a band beloved / hated like Oasis, simple workers of music turned into superstars for some, absolute geniuses for others. Extreme judgments, as befits two characters of the caliber of the Gallagher brothers, or those who have first set up and eventually finished the parable license plate Oasis, including recriminations, insults, blows to the head and, occasionally, some great piece for really.

Since the dissolution of one of the most famous and imitated in the nineties and noughties, we have inherited two obvious paths: the more psychedelic and ambitious autorale of High Flying Birds by Noel, and Beady Eye, Liam creature classic rock'n'roll ( and other ex Oasis), straight to the point, no frills, but also, so far, without any upsurge of genius. The debut of the latter, Different Gear, Still Speeding, had aroused great impression, with songs that seemed to be some bad b-side of the former group and a live activity that struggled to make sense of it all. Liam himself has admitted that the process that led to the birth of Beady Eye was essentially a reaction to the sudden dissolution of the band's mother and, therefore, little meditated.

Fixed the training with the addition of bassist Jay Mehler, coming from Kasabian, the five (in addition to Liam there are Andy Bell, Gem Archer and Chris Sharrock) have decided for a surprise move, choosing a producer like Dave Sitek, a member of the New Yorkers TV On The Radio - as far removed as you can imagine by Beady Eye, already at work with Yeah Yeah Yeahs -, and closing in the recording studio to manufacture a product that would finally live up to its reputation. Titled simply BE, but Liam had wanted to Universal Gleam, the album is what fans of the singer grumpy been waiting for, or a disc of great songs in line with the rock'n'roll markedly Sixties who had the good fortune of two brothers and brit pop phenomenon in general.

Sitek's work was, therefore, to focus on the ideas and make it compact, giving way to the unmistakable nasal voice of Liam and guitars of Archer and Bell. The quality is felt from the very individual, Flick Of The Finger (and title piece inspired by Street Fighting Years by Tariq Ali) and Second Bite Of The Apple, both blessed with a beautiful horn section that embellishes the melody, but that's all BE to shine those insights that its predecessor lacked: Do not Brother Me is a ballad dedicated - with great affection and frankness - his brother Noel, Face The Crowd is perfect for igniting the audience live, Iz Rite is the song that Oasis did not write for years, with a chorus to sing in the choir, Shine A Light is a psychedelic raga influences with classic Beatles. Start A New Closes, programmatic title, which is a prelude to the real take-off of Beady Eye. Welcome aboard!


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Restaurant Man review

Posted : 4 years, 4 months ago on 31 January 2013 03:38 (A review of Restaurant Man)

How does a nice Italian boy from Queens turn his passion for food and wine into an empire?

In his winning memoir, Restaurant Man, Joe Bastianich charts his culinary journey from working in his parents’ red-sauce joint to becoming one of the country’s most successful restaurateurs. Joe first learned the ropes from his father, Felice Bastianich, the ultrapragmatic, self-proclaimed “restaurant man.” After college and a year on Wall Street, Joe bought a one-way ticket to Italy and worked in restaurants and vineyards. Upon his return to New York, he partnered with his mother, Lidia, and soon joined forces with Mario Batali, establishing one superlative Italian restaurant after another.

Writing vividly in an authentic New York style that is equal parts rock ’n’ roll and hard-ass, bottom-line business reality, Joe explains: how Babbo changed the way people think of Italian restaurants; how Lupa and Esca were born of “hedonistic, boondoggle R&D trips” through Italy; and how Del Posto managed to overcome a menu that was so ambitious that at first it could not even be executed and became the first four-star Italian restaurant in America. He lays the smackdown on the wine industry, explaining that no bottle of wine costs more than five dollars to make.

Joe speaks frankly about friends and foes, but at the heart of the book is the mythical hero Restaurant Man, the old-school, bluecollar guy from Queens who once upon a time learned to sweat it out and make his money through hard work. Throughout he stays true to the real secret of his success—watching costs but being ferociously dedicated to exceeding the customer’s expectations on every level and delivering the best dining experience in the world.


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Un passo dal cielo review

Posted : 4 years, 8 months ago on 19 October 2012 03:33 (A review of Un passo dal cielo)

not so great stories but the landscape, wich is the Lago of Braies in tRENTINO, iTALY IS JUST WONDERFUL!!


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